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Thought Clothing

The enrepreneurial duo’s honest, down-to-earth personalities and sustainable sourcing was refreshing.

In 2002  the 'fledgling' brand was launched in the UK. He opened pop-up shops on London’s famous Portobello Road and at Camden Lock market. With countless phone calls and hard work, a flurry of independent boutiques soon stocked the growing collection, now available in over 1000 stores globally.

Location

UK

Product 

Clothing

Markets

Men & Women

Ethics

Organic cotton and natural materials

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Everlane

'Not big on trends. Instead wanting you to wear these pieces for years, even decades, to come. That’s why this enterprise aims to source the finest materials and factories for timeless products— like Grade-A cashmere sweaters, Italian shoes, and Peruvian Pima tees.  Denim is manufactured at the world's cleanest denim factory, using 98% recycled water, 85% air-dryed and using sustainable bricks made from denim by-products.

Location

US

Product

Clothing & Shoes

Markets

Men & Women

Ethics

'Exceptional quality. Ethical factories. Radical Transparency.'

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Naadam

Naadam is changing the world of cashmere as we know it, via two adventurous entrepreneurs who wanted to make things right in a world far removed from the everyday.  We love Naadams ethical production practices and dedication to producing only the finest cashmere goods at a fraction of the price of luxury brands, since they operate direct-to-consumer. Their ultra-soft cashmere is hand brushed from the goats (which is better for the goats), and is Cradle to Cradle certified, which sets a high standard to protect the people and resources involved in production. Plus, they help support nomadic herding families in Mongolia and provide veterinary care to their goats

Location

New York NY US

Product

Cashmere

Markets

Men & Women

Ethics

Supporting nomadic Mongolian farmers & their herds

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Etiko

Products without child labour and worker exploitation were the impetus for Nick Savaidis (founder) to commence Etiko at the end of 2005 after finding that, no matter how hard he tried, he couldn’t buy stuff such as sports balls, clothing & footwear, which he could be 100% confident hadn’t been made by a child or some poor worker being ripped off in a developing country. Sweatshops, corporate greed, globalisation, call it what you want, Nick knew that it sucked and it was time for an alternative.  Etiko’s products support the human and labour rights of cotton growers and rubber tappers, workers in apparel, sports ball and shoe production, and their families and communities in India, Sri Lanka and Pakistan.

Location

Vic Australia

Product

Clothing, Shoes & Sports Gear

Markets

Men & Women

Ethics

Human Rights